Zero waste Grocery Store A Contribution to Nature

A zero-waste grocery store recently opened its doors in Germany and everyone should get excited. 80% of items sold in supermarkets is wrapped in toxic packaging. In effect, Americans still produce near 3 pounds of trash every day, and this is a big problem. So what could be an intelligent solution? How about a zero-waste grocery store that utilizes no waste materials.

To eliminate food-packaging waste before it even gets into the shopping cart is the success behind Original Unvertpackt, a new supermarket in Germany that takes things into zero-waste territory by encouraging consumers to tote reusable containers to the store.

Nothing that comes in a disposable box, bag, jar, or other container is sold at this store. And instead of shelf after shelf of boxed items, this supermarket utilizes bulk bins, attractively displayed produce that’s not shrink wrapped or stored in tetra packs, and beverage stations for refillable water bottles.

It is the brainchild of Sara Wolf and Milena Glimbovski, two Germany-based social impact innovators. They want consumers to have a choice about how much food they buy, as well eliminating unnecessary waste associated with the packaging.

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Environmentalist or Priest

Half-burnt bodies will continue to be dumped in the Ganga and sewers continue to desecrate our holy rivers. Uncontrolled use of fireworks will continue to pollute the air and deafen the urban population during 5 days long Dipawali festival. Idols laced with chemical paints will be immersed in our water sources. If the mental and spiritual pollution of Hindus continues, India’s environment will continue to degrade. The spiritual cost will be beyond calculation. The human cost will be terrible.

When Lord Krishna was born, his father put him in a basket and crossed the Yamuna to reach the avatar of Vishnu to safety in the house of Yashoda and Nand.

This was to escape the cruelty of Kansa, the evil uncle of Lord Krishna. All the tales of Lord Krishna’s childhood have beautiful imagery of the Yamuna. In fact, in most Hindu minds, Yamuna and Krishna go together.

But take a look at the river now.

What if Lord Krishna were to come today and his father were to take him across the Yamuna! The putrid stench emanating from the water would be unbearable. And if the child Krishna were to sip the water, he would need to summon all the supernatural powers at his disposal to stay alive. The Yamuna has been polluted beyond imagination, mostly by those claiming to be Lord Krishna’s devotees.

Forgetting Vedic Culture:

“As we have always visualised ourselves as an integral part of the divine, and the divine as something which partakes in us, we have always maintained a harmonious relationship with nature. Indian literature, right from the ancient time to the present day, contains a detailed description of nature. Hardly any other literature from any other part of the world contains such an elaborate and intimate description,” writes Banwari, journalist and scholar on issues of environment and religion, in his book Pancavati: Indian Approach to Environment.

“The Vedic culture is aranyak , a culture of nature. You learn everything from nature. The panchbhootas are to be revered, not exploited,” says Swami Sevak Charan, an engineer-turned-environmental activist with the Sri Vrindavan Conservation Project in Vrindavan.

Political Power vs . Priest:

The general perception is that Indians are very sensitive about the matter of “religion”, so leaders do not want to touch upon the aspects related to it. This has made things worse. Clearly, it is a huge task to take on religious matters, revive their link with the ecology and undertake the greater task of carrying it to people all over again. While people in the religious arena are afraid to shoulder this burden, however some organisations and individuals have tried to integrate religion and the environment. And have succeeded.