Why do movies make us cry

Why do movies affect us

Our subconscious mind might mistakenly think that what we see in screens is real and so get affected. It also usually happens in a more powerful way since movies usally look more real than real life.

Empathy

If you have never experienced a certain kind of loss like the loss of a son or a loss of daughter or father you might not be able to fully empathize with a person who is facing this problem. If you have love for animal, seeing animal slaughter or pain or loss make you cry.

Guilt

If a person had a guilt problem where he wasn’t nice to his sister for example then any part of the movie that touches that wound can make that person feel really bad.

You always wanted to cry

This brings us to two more important conclusions. The wounds that caused this sadness were already there inside of you and the movie just reminded you of them. The second conclusion is that you always wanted to get rid of the burden by crying and the movie gave you the best chance to do it. In such a case crying in the movie gave you the opportunity to release the stored unconscious emotions while consciously believing that you are crying because of the movie.

Unconsciousness recall of memories

While watching a movie an unconscious recall of memories and fears can happen. This can lead to intense emotions that can be easily confused with the movie’s effect.

Now you might be wondering why some people get affected more than others by movies. The answer is simple. Depending on your beliefs, values and concerns you will get affected in a different way than others. And because each person is unique some people get affected more than others by movies.

Next time you cry in a movie better understand why it happened for it can tell you a lot about your personality.

 

Historic neighbourhood

herencyclopedia

7 years in Secunderabad 

What started as an exclusive preserve of the army in the British Raj has now turned into a city in its own right. And a beautiful one at that. Let’s take you through a tour of Secunderabad, the twin.

Winston Churchill, the Prime Minister of England during World War II, was posted in Secunderabad during the 1880s as a subaltern. He lived in a bungalow, surrounded by a large compound. It is still pointed out to visitors. He was very conscious of the fact that he and his colleagues were in Secunderabad to keep guard on the Nizam and the Old City of Hyderabad. They were convinced that it contained “all the scoundrels of Asia.” Legend has it that Churchill’s unit was transferred at such short notice that he was unable to settle his outstanding bill with the Secunderabad Club. This document is supposed to have…

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Historic neighbourhood

7 years in Secunderabad 

What started as an exclusive preserve of the army in the British Raj has now turned into a city in its own right. And a beautiful one at that. Let’s take you through a tour of Secunderabad, the twin.

Winston Churchill, the Prime Minister of England during World War II, was posted in Secunderabad during the 1880s as a subaltern. He lived in a bungalow, surrounded by a large compound. It is still pointed out to visitors. He was very conscious of the fact that he and his colleagues were in Secunderabad to keep guard on the Nizam and the Old City of Hyderabad. They were convinced that it contained “all the scoundrels of Asia.” Legend has it that Churchill’s unit was transferred at such short notice that he was unable to settle his outstanding bill with the Secunderabad Club. This document is supposed to have become a part of the Club’s archives.

The Army still has a substantial presence in Secunderabad, which was founded at the end of the 18th century as a British cantonment. The Nizam of Hyderabad and the East India Company signed a deed of Subsidiary Alliance for military and political cooperation, to make this possible.

In terms of geographical area and population, the Secunderabad cantonment is said to be the biggest in India and also one of the largest in Asia. The infrastructure management and administration of the civilian areas in the cantonment are looked after by the Board. As per the Cantonment Act of 2006, Secunderabad cantonment is classified as a Class-I cantonment.

 

Instant Results

End Results Are Secondary To… Instant Results!

I exercise and do yoga to improve my physical and emotional shape. I practice new skills for happiness of my brain cells. I write in order to finish a novel.

But think about this.

  • Going to the gym or yoga strengthens my willpower and resolve right now(before my muscles get stronger).

  • Practicing new skills strengthens my mental dexterity right now(ex.before I learn French).

  • Writing strengthens my communication skills and creativity right now (before I finish the book)

Pursuing a goal improves me right now in ways that could last a lifetime. Positive end results are wonderful, but they’re one-time events. By the time I reach an end result, I might have already gained plenty from its pursuit. Life is about the journey, not because of some wishy-washy sentiment, but because the journey produces the greatest personal growth and benefits.

Ignore “end results” to get more of them!

Of course, I still have to do things, but I dissected in not having to achieve a positive end result completely dissolves most resistance to action.

Is it easier to write a few pages of a story idea or to write a  blog ? Is it easier to make my entire house spotless or to “improve this area a little bit?” Is it easier to give a speech that ends in a 5 minute standing ovation or “to do my best and forget the rest?”

When we let go of our need for great end results, we unlock the power of the present moment to instantly make us into slightly better, more skilled people. When we obsess over that perfect result, we hesitate to try, we undervalue the power of resultless practice, and we stunt our potential in a haze of fantasy. Anyone can fantasize about doing great things, or reaching their fullest potential, but the only ones who get close are (ironically) those who move their gaze from the trophy and to the unimpressive, unheralded steps required to get it.

I’ll bet that we’re human and thus, there’s an area of our life that could be better. Beware! These areas are at the greatest risk for “result-wishing.” We want that promotion, that trophy husband or wife, that popular blog, that number on the scale, that level of musical mastery, that level of fitness, that respect from our peers, that dream house, that income, that happiness. Whatever it may be, be open to it happening and believe it’s possible, but don’t let our desire for it blind us to what’s possible now.

End results are the trophy. But we won’t get the trophy unless win the race. And we won’t win the race unless develop those subtle skills and improvements that come from trying your best regardless of results.This isn’t a call to drop our dreams and settle for less, it’s a call to step up and give ourself a chance to reach your dreams.

Bhastrika Pranayama

Bhastrikā (pronounced bha-STRI-kaah),is an important breath exercise in yoga and pranayama. It is sometimes treated as a kriya or ‘cleansing action’ along with kapalabhatito clear the airways in preparation for other pranayama techniques. Bhastrika involves a rapid and forceful inhalation and exhalation powered by the movement of the diaphragm. The movement of air is accompanied by an audible sound. One inhale and exhale equals one round of bhastrika and it may be repeated for many consecutive rounds. B. K. S. Iyengar explains that the similar “process or kriyā of kapālabhāti is a milder form of Bhastrikā Prāṇāyāma. Swami Sivananda describes the process: “inhale and exhale quickly ten times like the bellows of the blacksmith. Constantly dilate and contract. When you practise this Pranayama a hissing sound is produced. The practitioner should start with rapid expulsions of breath following one another in rapid succession. When the required number of expulsions, say ten for a round, is finished, the final expulsion is followed by a deepest possible inhalation. The breath is suspended as long as it could be done with comfort. Then deepest possible exhalation is done very slowly. The end of this deep exhalation completes one round of Bhastrika”.

bhastrika_pranayama1
Inhale while raising up your both hands
bhastrika_pranayama2
Exhale with force by making

Importance of name

Bhastrika Pranayama is one of the main forms of Pranayama. In Sanskrit, Bhastrika means the ‘bellows’. It is said to purify the mind and clear pranic blocks. Rapid succession of forcible expulsion is a characteristic feature of Bhastrika.

Technique

Sit in any steady asana – Padmasana, Siddhasana and Vajrasana are ideal for the practice. Keep the body erect and close the mouth. Inhale and exhale in rapid succession. During this process a hissing sound is produced. Start with say 10 inhalations and exhalations per round. It can be increased over a period of time. Some practitioners even do it till they get perspiration. Some practice Bhastrika along with Kumbhaka (holding of the breath) at the end of the last exhalation. To do this, take a deep breath after the last exhalation and hold the breath inside for as long as comfortable. Then exhale and start breathing normally. This will constitute one round.

Benefits

  • Bhastrika pranayama increases the oxygen content in the blood. Extra oxygen replenishes the entire body
  • It removes blockages in the nose and chest
  • It is good for asthma patients and removes inflammation of the throat
  • It increases the gastric fire and improves appetite
  • Bhastrika when practiced with Kumbhaka can generate heat in the body and keep it warm in cold weather
  • It improves general health and activates all the organs
  • Bhastrika purifies the nadis or the energy (pranic) channels in the body, ensuring free flow of prana to all the organs in the body

Anuloma Viloma Pranayama – Alternate Nostril Breathing

यथा सिंहो गजो वयाघ्रो भवेद्वश्यः शनैः शनैः |
तथैव सेवितो वायुरन्यथा हन्ति साधकम || १५ ||

yathā siṃho ghajo vyāghro bhavedvaśyaḥ śanaiḥ śanaiḥ |
tathaiva sevito vāyuranyathā hanti sādhakam || 15 ||

Meanining : Just as lions, elephants and tigers are controlled by and by, so the breath is controlled by slow degrees,
otherwise  – Hatha Yoga Pradipika

Anuloma Pranayama (अनुलोम प्राणायाम) is one of several Pranayama or breath exercises used in the practice of Hatha yoga. Anu roughly translates as “with” and Loma means hair implying “with the grain” or “natural”. It is the opposite of Viloma Pranayama(विलोम प्राणायाम) which means against the grain.

anuloma-viloma-pranayama

How to do Anuloma Viloma Pranayama (Alternate Nostril Breathing):

 

  1. Sit in a steady asana. Padmasana is most suited for the practice.Siddhasana and Vajrasana may also be used, else You may sit in Sukhasana(easy asnasa)
  2. Close the right nostril with your thumb and draw in air from the left nostril. Do this as slowly as you can, till your lungs are full.
  3. Now release the thumb and close the left nostril with your ring finger. Then breathe out slowly through the right nostril.
  4. Next take the air in from the right nostril and then release it through the left nostril (after closing the right nostril with the thumb).
  5. This is one round of Anulom Vilom Pranayama.
  6. Start with 5 rounds and increase it up to 20 rounds in one sitting.
  7. Also, the duration of inhalation can start from 2 seconds and go up to 20 seconds or even beyond.
  8. One can have one sitting in the morning and one in the evening. For advanced practitioners, the yogic texts recommends four sittings – one in the morning, one at noon, one in the evening and one at midnight. But for all practical purposes, two sittings (one in morning and one in evening) are enough.
  9. After one has reached a certain level of proficiency, one can addKumbhaka or retention of breath to the practice.

Ratio of Inhalation, Retention and Exhalation

Pranayama practitioners start with the ratio of 1:1 for inhalation and exhalation. For example if you inhale for 4 seconds through one nostril, then the exhalation from the other nostril is also 4 seconds. As you progress, the ratio can be changed to 1:2, which means if inhalation is 4 seconds, then exhalation is 8 seconds.

Once you add Kumbhaka (retention of breath), the ratio can start with 1:1:1. For example, 4 seconds of inhalation, 4 seconds of retention and 4 seconds of exhalation. With further progress, the ratio can be increased to 1:1:2, 1:2:2, 1:4:2, etc. The ratio of 1:4:2 is mentioned in most classic yoga texts. Those who practice advanced ratios of this pranayama, should eat only Satvic food (pure, nourishing and light).

Benefits of Anulom Vilom Pranayama (Alternate Nostril Breathing)

  1. Anuloma Viloma Pranayama cleans the pranic channels and makes the prana flow freely in the entire body. The nadis or the pranic energy channels are purified. Hence this pranayama is also called Nadi Shodhana Pranayama.
  2. Purification of the energy channels ensures proper supply of pranic energy to all the organs enhancing the overall health of the body.
  3. Anulom Vilom Pranyama balances the two main energy channels –Ida and Pingala. It balances the two hemispheres of the brain, bringing about peace and tranquility.
  4. When the Ida and Pingala nadis are balanced, it awakens the central channel called Sushumna Nadi.
  5. It removes toxins from the body.
  6. Prolonged practice of Anuloma Viloma Pranayama leads to next stage of yoga, which is Pratyahara or withdrawal of the senses. This enables the practitioner to progress towards higher practices ofDharana, Dhyana and Samadhi.
  7. It can reduce weight in some practitioners depending on their body constitution and is a good practice for obesity.

** The duration of inhalation and expiration depends entirely on the capacity of the practitioner. Start with whatever you are comfortable with – say 4 seconds inhalation and 4 seconds exhalation. Later it can be increased up to 20 seconds or even more.

Theam Earth day 2016

meditation
Earth day 2016 

Tree

Goal – planting 7.8 billion trees.

Why Trees?

Trees help combat climate change.
They absorb excess and harmful CO2 from our atmosphere. In fact, in a single year, an acre of mature trees absorbs the same amount of CO2 produced by driving the average car 26,000 miles.

Trees help us breathe clean air.
Trees absorb odors and pollutant gases (nitrogen oxides, ammonia, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and filter particulates out of the air by trapping them on their leaves and bark.

Trees help communities.
Trees help communities achieve long-term economic and environmental sustainability and provide food, energy and income.

** Plant a tree. Make a donation. Activate your friends and social networks.